Review 1831: The Tolstoy Estate

Paul Bauer, an army surgeon during the World War II German invasion of Russia, finds himself stationed at Yasnaya Polyana, the ancestral estate of Leo Tolstoy. It is set up as a field hospital.

The men are startled to find a woman on the estate—Katerina Trubetzkaya, the Head Custodian. She and the estate workers refuse to leave. Bauer, who speaks a little Russian and is an admirer of Tolstoy, finds himself almost immediately falling in love with her.

This novel details the six weeks of the German army’s occupation of Yasnaya Polyana. Toward the middle, the book jumps ahead in the form of letters to tell what happened to the characters.

I enjoyed this novel. I thought that the descriptions of the field hospital and the characters’ activities seemed convincing. Particularly convincing seemed the descriptions of the cold. Conte does a good job of humanizing the German soldiers while still including some inflexible and dogmatic soldiers and some true Fascists. For example, the commander, Julius Metz, is slowly becoming unhinged from treatments of amphetimines.

Despite the novel being described in grandiose terms on the cover, I felt there was something slight about it. The love affair it was centered on wasn’t very convincing, for one thing, and I didn’t like how the letters broke the forward action of the plot and somehow seemed to trivialize the story. They certainly destroyed any suspense about whether the main characters would survive.

Since Tolstoy seems to be important to Conte, perhaps he could have found some way to sustain this importance. He says in the acknowledgements that both the Soviet and German soldiers were “acutely conscious of the site’s cultural, ideological, and even metaphysical significance,” but in the novel, of the Germans only Bauer and Metz, in his weird way, seem to be. I read this for my Walter Scott prize project.

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6 thoughts on “Review 1831: The Tolstoy Estate

  1. Marg April 7, 2022 / 5:00 pm

    I loved this book when I read it a couple of years ago!!

  2. John Schimmelman April 8, 2022 / 1:57 am

    I liked this book, but thought the use of letters throughout was clunky. I got tired of them and found myself wishing he would just tell the damn story and drop the contrivance.

    • whatmeread April 8, 2022 / 10:58 am

      Yes, it didn’t work well, did it? Thanks for commenting, John!

  3. Helen April 8, 2022 / 5:35 am

    I have a copy of this which I’m hoping to read soon too. I’m glad you enjoyed it, even if there are one or two problems with it. It does sound like an interesting book.

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