Review 2010: Punishment of a Hunter

When Zaitsev and his homicide team in 1930 Leningrad investigate the death of Faina Baranova, he knows there is something odd about it. Although all her clothing is practical, she is dressed in velvet and posed before red curtains the neighbors in her communal apartment say are not hers. There is something theatrical in the scene. However, after months, the team finds no clues.

In a meeting at work of the OGPU, Zaitsev is accused of hiding bourgeois origins. He claims he knows nothing about his father, having grown up in an orphanage. Pasha, his building janitor, shows up in support and claims to have known his mother; nevertheless, some days later he is arrested.

After a few months, he is released without explanation. Zaitsev soon figures out he is to solve another murder, this time of a group of people on the site of a new park planned by Kirov, head of the party in Leningrad. The unspoken message is solve the case or go back to jail. However, because he’s been released, his colleagues no longer trust him and won’t speak to him about work.

Aside from presenting an intriguing mystery, Punishment of a Hunter evokes 1930 Leningrad, beautiful but gray and tired, the atmosphere paranoid, citizens poorly clad and fed. I was convinced by this post-revolutionary world as I was not by the popular A Gentleman in Moscow. I hope Pushkin Press will be publishing more books by Yakovlevna.

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5 thoughts on “Review 2010: Punishment of a Hunter

  1. thecontentreader August 17, 2022 / 10:44 am

    Sounds like a different and interesting read. It will go to my list.

  2. FictionFan August 18, 2022 / 2:26 am

    Hmm, I also wasn’t convinced by A Gentleman in Moscow, so perhaps I should try this one…

    • whatmeread August 18, 2022 / 10:22 am

      Yeah, I thought it handled the aftermath of the Russian Revolution really poorly and unrealistically.

  3. Marg September 17, 2022 / 1:43 am

    I do find Russian history fascinating!

    Thanks for sharing this review with the Historical Fiction Reading Challenge.

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