Review 1885: Travelers

When I first began reading Travelers, I thought I would be disappointed in it, because the bio said Habila had won several awards for his writing, but I found a misplaced modifier in the first few pages. Can’t help it—I’m a grammar nerd. However, I soon found the novel compelling.

It is structured as six novellas, which are linked by the presence or acquaintance with the unnamed narrator. He is a Nigerian student who is supposed to be finishing his dissertation in Washington when his American artist wife receives a fellowship in Berlin. Their marriage has been suffering since she had a miscarriage, and they see the move as an opportunity for a new start, but while his wife works hard, the narrator seems to be aimless, wandering around Berlin and ignoring his work. He becomes interested in a group of activists living in a squat and taking part in demonstrations. Several of them are refugees from Africa, including Mark, a transgender artist.

In this first novella, we meet Manu, who we learn about in the second novella. As Manu’s family crossed the Mediterranean in a derelict boat, the boat sank and he lost track of his wife and baby son. Every Sunday, he and his daughter search the area around Checkpoint Charlie for his wife and son.

In the third story, Portia, a Zambian studying in England, has traveled to Basel to meet Katharina, who used to be married to her brother David. She has gone there to understand her brother better, a man who always seemed to want to leave home, but also, at her mother’s behest, to find out why Katharina killed him.

In the fourth story, after meeting Portia and traveling with her to Basel, the narrator listens to the tale of a Somalian whom he meets on a train. This man and his son have suffered unimaginable hardships trying to find a place for themselves and their family. However, in a moment of confusion, the narrator loses his identity papers and finds himself incarcerated in a refugee camp.

This novel examines the state of many east and west African countries and the plight of African refugees in Europe. Habila is a master at quickly involving readers in the lives of its many often incidentally encountered characters. I read Travelers for my James Tait Black project.

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5 thoughts on “Review 1885: Travelers

  1. Liz Dexter July 4, 2022 / 1:05 pm

    That sounds like an intriguing work portraying an important topic very viscerally.

    • whatmeread July 4, 2022 / 1:07 pm

      Maybe viscerally is overstating it, but it is affecting.

      • Liz Dexter July 4, 2022 / 1:14 pm

        Ah, OK, that’s a relief, actually!

  2. Rebecca Foster July 5, 2022 / 6:44 am

    This sounds very interesting. Perhaps a bit like Teju Cole’s works?

    I had to laugh at you mentioning the grammar being a turnoff — I gave up on The Tattooist of Auschwitz on the second page after I found a dangling modifier (and the writing in general didn’t seem strong).

    • whatmeread July 5, 2022 / 10:27 am

      I only found the one mistake. I’m not familiar with Teju Cole.

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