Review 1795: American War

In 2074, Sarat Chestnut is only six when her father is killed by a terrorist bomb while trying to get a permit for his family to move into the north and safety. The Chestnuts live in a United States divided by civil war with its coastlines eroded far back from global warming. As residents of Louisiana, they reside in a purple state, a state that while it belongs to the North (blue states) has many Southern sympathizers (reds).

After Benjamin Chestnut’s death, Martina, Sarat’s mother, is told that the fighting in East Texas is coming nearer and she should retreat to the refugee camp at Camp Patience in Mississippi. As a resident of Camp Patience, Sarat grows up witnessing terrible events and is slowly groomed by Mr. Gaines to be a terrorist.

In between the chapters about Sarat, El Akkad includes documents about the war leading readers to realize that even more horrific events are ahead and, to me at least, telegraphing Sarat’s fate.

Like most good dystopian novels, this one puts our world troubles into perspective and holds a warning for us. Although dystopia is not really my genre, I found this novel riveting. I read it for my James Tait Black project.

The Parable of the Sower

The Year of the Flood

The Testaments

2 thoughts on “Review 1795: American War

  1. Janakay | YouMightAsWellRead February 4, 2022 / 7:41 pm

    I do at times enjoy a good distopian novel & this one sounds intriguing. I’ll definitely keep it in mind!

    • whatmeread February 4, 2022 / 8:34 pm

      This not my genre, as I said, but it was very interesting because it related closely to events in the present.

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