Review 1723: A Fugue in Time

Godden attempts something unusual in A Fugue in Time. She makes a house that has held the same family for a century into a sort of conscious entity and tells the story of the family in collapsing time.

It’s World War II, and old Rolls Dane has received notice that the 99-year lease on his house has elapsed and the owners want it back. The house was the one his parents moved into upon their marriage, and it has been the scene of many events, including his own unhappy love affair.

Rolls has been leading a reclusive life with only one servant left in the big house, and he is not pleased when his great niece, Grizel, an American officer, comes to ask if she can stay in the house. Later, Pax Masterson, an RAF officer being treated for burns, comes to visit the house that he’s heard about all his life from his mother, Lark, the girl Rolls’s father brought home many years before after her parents died in a railway accident.

Although I eventually got involved in this novel, its basic premise seemed at first affected and I didn’t think it was going to work. Early on, for example, there is a five- or six-page description of the house that slowed momentum to a standstill. Then, the shifts in time sometimes take place within the same paragraph, and at first it’s hard to grasp the when. There are some cues, for example Rolls’s name changes from Roly to Rollo to Rolls.

This is not one of my favorite Godden books, but the idea behind it is an interesting one. It reminded me a little of A Harp in Lowndes Square, in which images and sounds of the future and past reside in a house.

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4 thoughts on “Review 1723: A Fugue in Time

  1. Cynthia September 21, 2021 / 10:23 am

    This looks pretty interesting. I might have to take a look at it. I love old houses so the premise is intriguing.

    • whatmeread September 22, 2021 / 11:24 am

      The other novel I mentioned in the review is also interesting for that.

    • whatmeread September 23, 2021 / 5:24 pm

      I thought it was okay, but a much better one, about an old house I think, is A Harp in Lowndes Square by Rachel Ferguson, if you can find it.

      • smalltinyvoice September 25, 2021 / 7:27 pm

        I’ll hold onto that title.

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