Review 1678: The World My Wilderness

Seventeen-year-old Barbary Deniston has grown up running wild in occupied France and was a member of the enfante maquis of the French Resistance. Now that the war is over, she doesn’t seem to know the difference and is still involved with the maquis, which is hunting down collaborators. Her mother, Helen, was neglectful while happy with her stepfather, but now that he has died, they’ve had a falling out. Helen decides to send her to London to live with her father, Gulliver. Also going is her stepbrother Raoul, who is to study and learn his uncle’s business.

Barbary is a fish out of water in her father’s upper-middle-class home. He is too busy with work to pay attention to her, and his wife, Pamela, dislikes her. In many ways immature, Barbary believes her parents would reunite if it weren’t for Pamela and her baby son, so she is determined to dislike them. Her father enrolls her at the Sloane and just assumes she goes there, but she and Raoul roam the streets and find a ruined section of London that reminds them of home. Soon, they are associating with deserters and thieves.

Macaulay treats all of her flawed characters with empathy, but it was hard for me to relate to Barbary. However, this novel made me realize how chaotic post-war France and London must have been. I haven’t read any other books that deal with that subject.

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2 thoughts on “Review 1678: The World My Wilderness

  1. historicalfictionisfiction June 17, 2021 / 12:36 pm

    You mentioned Rumer Godden some days back she wrote a wonderful story of post-war London titled “An Episode of Sparrows.” Somewhat the same theme, but vastly more sympathetic characters. you might give it a try; it’s one my very favorite Godden’s.

    • whatmeread June 17, 2021 / 2:07 pm

      Oh, thanks! I’ll look for it! I have recently been reading all of Godden’s Indian novels, but a few others crept in.

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