Review 1581: Somewhere in England

When I received a review copy of Somewhere in England from Furrowed Middlebrow, I realized that it was a sequel. So, I ordered the previous book, the delightful Nothing to Report, to read and review first.

To introduce the plot of Somewhere in England, I have to include a spoiler or two for the previous book. The novel begins with 18-year-old Pippa Johnson, who is about to take a position in a war hospital established in the family home of Mary Morrison, the main character of the previous book. In between novels, Mary Morrison married Kit Hungerford, who had purchased her family home. Now, Mary Hungerford is administering the hospital.

The first part of the novel has to do with Pippa meeting the hospital staff and villagers. It is more concerned with the social side of things than the war work as we meet familiar characters again. Elisabeth, who made her debut the summer of 1939 in the previous book, is a nurse whose fiancé has died, and she is rude to young Pippa. Lalage is friendly and will make a good nurse, but her sister Rosemary and mother Marcelle continue with their selfish ways. Most people, though, are occupied with some kind of war work.

The second part of the novel returns to the point of view of Mary, who is constantly dealing with difficult situations all the while worried for her husband overseas.

I enjoyed this novel, but it is hard to describe. It was fun to revisit the characters of Nothing to Report and see how they’re doing during the war. I think that as a sequel it stands well enough alone, but my enjoyment was enhanced by having read Nothing to Report first.

Related Posts

Nothing to Report

Northbridge Rectory

Atonement

12 thoughts on “Review 1581: Somewhere in England

  1. Izabel Brekilien November 24, 2020 / 11:41 am

    So book #2 was good too, that’s a relief – I’ve been reading series these days where the first book is wonderful but the others let me down. I’ve added Carola Oman to my TBR 😉

    • whatmeread November 24, 2020 / 2:41 pm

      Oh, that’s too bad. I do think the first book was a little better, but they were both good. I think I’m saying that only because I really liked the character of Mary Morrison, and she’s not as present in the second book until the second half.

  2. Jane November 24, 2020 / 12:47 pm

    love the sound of these and haven’t started yet on Furrowed Middlebrow, better start saving!

    • whatmeread November 24, 2020 / 2:42 pm

      You could request review copies. They’re very nice about it.

      • Jane November 25, 2020 / 12:10 pm

        I daren’t do that, it takes me so long to read a book they’d be waiting for ever and then I’d feel stressed and pressured!

      • whatmeread November 25, 2020 / 12:57 pm

        That’s too bad. They usually send them out several months before they’re published. Like, I just got several for January. They don’t want you to review them until publication date.

  3. Davida Chazan November 25, 2020 / 6:59 am

    Nice to hear. They sent me two other novels due out in January. I’m reading one of them now (almost finished) and enjoying it very much!

    • whatmeread November 25, 2020 / 10:59 am

      Me, too. I haven’t started them yet. I wonder if we have the same two.

      • Davida Chazan November 26, 2020 / 12:00 am

        I got Rhododendron Pie by Margery Sharp and A Pink Front Door by Stella Gibbons. What did you get?

      • whatmeread November 26, 2020 / 12:05 am

        I also got a Margery Sharp, but not that one, I don’t think. I did get A Pink Front Door. Oh, the Sharp was The Stone of Chastity.

      • Davida Chazan November 26, 2020 / 1:47 am

        I just finished Rhododendron Pie… lovely! Enjoy!

  4. Liz Dexter November 29, 2020 / 1:17 pm

    I’m going to keep this for when I’ve read both!

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