Review 1506: The Broom of the System

We first meet Lenore Beadsman in 1981 as a 15-year-old on a visit to her sister at Mount Holyoke. There, three guys from Amherst invade the girls’ dorm room and more or less sexually assault them, except Lenore, who leaves. The point of this part?

We meet her again working as a receptionist in Cleveland and having an affair with her boss, Rick Vigorous. Her great-grandmother has disappeared from a nursing home along with a substantial number of patients and some staff. The manager of the home, which is owned by Lenore’s wealthy father, has been asked to keep the incident quiet, but he asks Lenore to contact her father. She is unable to reach him, however.

I tried hard to read this novel, which I know is considered brilliant and was recommended by my brother, but I just couldn’t get on the same wavelength with it. Though I know it was considered innovative in its time (1987), it seemed dated to me, both in its bizarre zany humor, which reminded me of A Confederacy of Dunces, Tim Robbins, or Richard Brautigan, and in its treatment of women. I read about a quarter of it but saw myself completely lose interest when the cockatiel started spouting break-up lines. The novel just seemed too ridiculous, and I also felt it wasn’t going anywhere. The hyper-intellectual dialogue seemed completely unlikely. It also seemed pretentious.

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3 thoughts on “Review 1506: The Broom of the System

  1. Silvia May 13, 2020 / 7:36 am

    So odd, what’s wrong with some writers? Lol. I liked A Confederacy of Dunces, but this novel sounds like a waste of time.
    I love your reviews of failed books. 🙂 I enjoy reading your blog.

    • whatmeread May 13, 2020 / 10:41 am

      Yet my brother gave it a high recommendation! I actually have read A Confederacy of Dunces two too many times.

      • Silvia May 13, 2020 / 10:47 am

        Oh, hahaha

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