Review 1356: The Ides of April

Cover for The Ides of AprilFor a long time, I followed Lindsey Davis’s Marcus Didius Falco mystery series set in Ancient Rome. Davis knows her period, and the books are amusing, but after a while I got tired of them. A few friends have recommended her newer Flavia Alba series, so when I found the first one at the library, I decided to try it.

Flavia Alba is the daughter of Marcus Didius Falco and Helena Justina, who adopted her as an abandoned and wild fifteen-year-old in Britain on one of their cases. Hence, I was vaguely aware of her in some of the Falco books. At the beginning of The Ides of April, she is a young widow who has become an enforcer in her adoptive father’s footsteps.

As a female enforcer, she doesn’t get the best cases. She is trying to get her client, Salvidia, off the hook in a lawsuit against her company for running down a young boy. The aedile, Manlius Faustus, has advertised for witnesses to the accident, so she goes to his office to find out if anyone has left a statement. At the office, she encounters two key characters, Tiberius, who works for the aedile, and Andronicus, an archivist, with whom she begins a flirtation.

Flavia Alba’s case very soon becomes more sinister as she learns that her client, Salvidia, is dead of no apparent cause. A visit to the undertaker leads her to understand that a lot of healthy people are dying for no apparent reason. She begins investigating these deaths despite being warned off by the aedile’s office, but soon she is working with them in the person of Tiberius.

Unfortunately, although I enjoyed this book in some ways, there was nothing new here. Flavia Alba’s jaunty, flippant first person sounds exactly like Falco’s. Davis avoids too much repetition by hardly mentioning Flavia Alba’s parents, even when she goes to visit them, but by then I would have been happy to meet them again.

As to the mystery, there is one character with a hidden identity that was obvious to me, and I was onto the murderer fairly quickly, at least mistrusting this character almost immediately. The story arc is very similar to Davis’s first book, Silver Pigs, in that the main character encounters someone who may be a future love interest.

So, for me anyway, been there, done that.

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4 thoughts on “Review 1356: The Ides of April

  1. Helen May 28, 2019 / 1:49 pm

    I still haven’t read anything by Lindsey Davis but I would like to try the Falco series.

    • whatmeread May 28, 2019 / 3:29 pm

      I recommend you read him in order, not because of the mysteries but because of Falco’s life. Silver Pigs is the first one, and it is very good.

  2. Ruthiella May 28, 2019 / 4:06 pm

    I’ve heard of the Falco series but not read it. I did read the first few SPQR books by John Maddox Robert which also take place in ancient Rome. I understand the” been there, done that” feeling though. That can happen often in genre fiction I think.

    • whatmeread May 28, 2019 / 5:45 pm

      Yes, you’re right. I tried one or two of Robert’s series, but the Falco books were appealing because of the humor. That’s exactly what wore a little thin after a while, though. Still, I probably read at least 15 of them.

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