Review 1351: Taken at the Flood

Cover for Taken at the FloodHercule Poirot is the interested listener to the club bore one evening in 1944. Major Porter tells the story of a widow who went on to marry Gordon Cloade, a wealthy man. Mr. Cloade was recently killed in the blitz, but Porter’s story is about Mrs. Cloade’s previous husband, Captain Underhay. Underhay reportedly made remarks to the effect that if he was reported dead, he may not be. Instead, he might return to his widow under the name Enoch Arden, a reference to a poem. Later, he was reported dead in Africa.

Two years later, Poirot is consulted by another Mrs. Cloade, the sister-in-law of the woman from the story. She wants Poirot to find Robert Underhay, whom she believes may be alive. She presents this request as a favor to Rosaleen Cloade, the widow of Gordon Cloade, but in fact, the Cloades, who were taught to depend on Gordon financially, were disinherited by Rosaleen when Gordon died intestate. If Robert Underhay can be found to be alive, Rosaleen’s marriage to Gordon will be nullified, to the benefit of the rest of the Cloades. Two days later, Poirot reads that a man named Enoch Arden was found dead in Warmsley Vale, the home of the Cloades.

Who killed Enoch Arden? It seems that the only people with a motive are Rosaleen Cloade and her brother, David Hunter, assuming Enoch Arden was Captain Underhay. But was he?

This is a complicated mystery and not one of Christie’s best. Her talent for portraying characters is lacking in this novel, as many of them seem flat.  It also seems unlikely that anyone would ever guess the culprit, so few clues point in that direction.

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4 thoughts on “Review 1351: Taken at the Flood

  1. Jane May 16, 2019 / 10:55 am

    I haven’t even heard of this one, it does sound disappointing though so may be that’s why

    • whatmeread May 16, 2019 / 11:09 am

      I don’t think it’s one of her better-known books. I picked it up because I hadn’t heard of it, either.

  2. Helen May 17, 2019 / 4:15 pm

    I haven’t read this one yet, but probably will eventually. Sorry you found it disappointing. I do prefer mysteries where the reader is given enough clues to be able to guess the solution.

    • whatmeread May 17, 2019 / 4:18 pm

      Yes, I think that’s really the whole point.

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