Day 1289: The Clockmaker’s Daughter

Cover for The Clockmaker's DaughterBest Book of Five!
The first character we meet in The Clockmaker’s Daughter is the ghost of the clockmaker’s daughter. Although she used the name Lily Millington, we don’t find out her true name, or why she haunts Birchwood Manor, until the end of the novel.

The novel begins in the present, though, with Elodie, an archivist. She is about to be married, but she is having trouble concentrating on the wedding. That is because, in going through the archive of James W. Stratton, a philanthropist, she has found the belongings of a Victorian artist, Edward Radcliffe, in particular, a sketchbook. This discovery is of interest because inside it is a picture that she realizes is of a house from a children’s story handed down in her own family.

link to NetgalleyWhile Elodie begins exploring this link between Radcliffe and her family, we slowly hear the stories of Lily Millington, of a beloved house, and of a long-lost family heirloom. We also learn the stories of a series of inhabitants of the house.

Although I love a good ghost story, I wasn’t sure whether I would appreciate the ghost being one of the narrators. And this is not a traditional ghost story, for the ghost is not one that frightens. Kate Morton is a masterful storyteller, however, so that I was engrossed as always. Although this is not my favorite book by Morton, which still remains The Forgotten Garden, I really enjoyed it.

Related Posts

The Forgotten Garden

The Secret Keeper

The Lake House

4 thoughts on “Day 1289: The Clockmaker’s Daughter

  1. Jane December 1, 2018 / 11:38 am

    I haven’t read any Kate Morton, I’m not really sure what stops me so I’ll start with The Forgotten Garden as a recommendation is always the best place to start!

  2. Davida Chazan December 8, 2018 / 2:33 am

    This was the first book of Morton’s I’ve read, and while I wasn’t overly impressed by the plot and story line here, WOW can this woman write! I swear, she’s a true master with words. If not, I know I wouldn’t have finished reading this book.

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