Day 1090: The Vicar of Wakefield

Cover for The Vicar of WakefieldI originally selected The Vicar of Wakefield for my Classics Club list because I was trying to choose a few works from different centuries. For the 18th century, I selected this novel and a few others.

Apparently, there is some debate among scholars about whether to take this novel straightforwardly as a sentimental work or to view it as a satire of sentimental novels. Since it reminds me of nothing so much as Candide, I take it as a satire. Even the title is confusing, since the vicar leaves Wakefield for another town early in the novel.

Reverend Primrose leads a comfortable life with his family as the Vicar of Wakefield. His own private fortune is enough that he has made over his salary to various charities. However, early in the novel, he loses his fortune when the merchant he has invested it with runs off. At that point, he leaves Wakefield and his considerable salary for a much smaller salary in another town. Why he does this instead of using his salary for himself is unclear.

Although the family is now poor, Primrose is determined that they can still live happily if they simplify their lives. However, some of his family are not willing to simplify, and their troubles are not over. His oldest boy, George, has had his engagement broken off by his fiancée’s father. And things even get worse. From here on, every decision they make turns out poorly, touching everyone in the family. In fact, though trusting and ready to see the good side of everyone, Primrose shows himself to be remarkably poor in judgment. The family is cheated, deceived, and persecuted by enemies. All the time, though, Primrose tries to see the good in every situation.

This short novel moves along nicely and has a charming though inconsistent narrator in Reverend Primrose. Its narrative is occasionally interrupted, though, by philosophizing and sermonizing, which I found tedious. Some of the plot twists and masquerades are easy to predict, but overall the novel is lively and a bit silly.

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4 thoughts on “Day 1090: The Vicar of Wakefield

  1. TJ @ MyBookStrings June 7, 2017 / 8:55 am

    I’ve been wanting to read this ever since being reminded that Jo reads it in Little Women. I think, though, that the sermonizing would put me off a little bit as well.

    • whatmeread June 7, 2017 / 10:01 am

      You could probably skip it. I tried to read a little of it but then skipped it. It may have served a purpose, perhaps satirical, but I didn’t have the patience for it.

  2. Helen June 7, 2017 / 2:23 pm

    I haven’t read this but I’ve been wanting to read more 18th century novels, so I would like to try it. Maybe when I start my second Classics Club list!

  3. whatmeread June 7, 2017 / 9:27 pm

    That’s a good idea. I am two books away from posting my second list!

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