Day 903: Some Do Not

Cover for Some Do NotBest Book of the Week!
Some Do Not is the first volume of Ford Madox Ford’s tetrology “Parade’s End,” which is considered one of the great novels about World War I. For those who are interested, an excellent TV series came out a few years ago starring Benedict Cumberbatch (or maybe for those who are interested in Benedict Cumberbatch).

When we first meet Christopher Tietjens in 1912 or so, he is separated from his wife Sylvia and on a golfing trip with MacMaster, his coworker and friend from school days. We eventually learn that Sylvia was having an affair with a married man when she met Tietjens, and the paternity of their son is in question. Sylvia has run off to Europe with a lover, but Christopher has just received a letter from her asking to come back.

Christopher Tietjens is a big clumsy man who is a sort of genius with facts and figures and works for the government. (That was the one weakness of the casting of Cumberbatch, who is neither big nor clumsy, in the part, as several times he is forced to refer to himself that way, which struck me as odd before I read the book.) He is also absolutely principled and honest. He agrees to take Sylvia back because that is how a gentleman behaves.

On this golfing trip, though, complications begin that are to affect the rest of his life. A member of the golfing party is General Campion, an idiotic but well-meaning man who likes Sylvia and so thinks that any problems in the marriage must be Christopher’s fault. When Christopher helps a couple of suffragettes escape from the police, the General immediately concludes that one of them, Valentine Wannop, must be Christopher’s mistress, even though Christopher has never met her before. Later on, similar misunderstandings contrive to blacken his reputation.

Egging everyone on is Sylvia, who takes a long time to understand the character of her husband. She believes he and Valentine must be lovers and even spreads the rumor that he is sharing a mistress with MacMaster. Mrs. Duchemin, whose husband is an academic with mental issues, is indeed having an affair with MacMaster, but Christopher’s only crime is to help MacMaster financially. Some of Sylvia’s ex-lovers or would-be lovers are also eager to harm him.

Christopher does fall in love with Valentine, but he doesn’t act on it because he is incapable of treating her dishonorably. With social ruin threatening him, he goes to war.

I tried out this first volume to see if I would like it after having watched the TV series. As soon as I finished it, I ordered the other three volumes. This is a great novel, about how a completely honorable but reticent man is misunderstood and dishonored by almost everyone around him.

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8 thoughts on “Day 903: Some Do Not

  1. Helen May 18, 2016 / 2:38 pm

    I read The Good Soldier by Ford Madox Ford last year and enjoyed it, so I will probably try the Parade’s End books at some point. I’m glad you liked the first one and I hope the other three volumes will be just as good.

    • whatmeread May 18, 2016 / 3:28 pm

      Yes, they are. I finished them, but haven’t caught up with my reviews. I want to read The Good Soldier soon.

  2. Naomi May 18, 2016 / 8:28 pm

    I’m glad to hear you like this! My mom got me the all-in-one volume for my birthday last year.

    • whatmeread May 19, 2016 / 6:46 pm

      I think you’ll like it. Having the book in four different volumes just seemed like a way to make more money from it. It’s not that long.

  3. Carolyn O May 19, 2016 / 9:54 am

    The Good Solider was part of my undergrad thesis, and Parade’s End is on my list of doorstoppers to read. Can’t wait!

    • whatmeread May 19, 2016 / 6:46 pm

      I want to read The Good Soldier soon.

      • Carolyn O May 19, 2016 / 8:37 pm

        It is pretty damn depressing, but very, very good.

      • whatmeread May 20, 2016 / 9:29 am

        I didn’t think Parade’s End was depressing, although some sad things happen.

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